Have you seen the light?

In architecture, Light Reflectance Values (LRV), are a measure of the percentage of visible and usable light that is reflected from a surface when illuminated by a light source.

Why are Light Reflectance Values important?

The Equality Act 2010 requires that all new and refurbished public buildings and workplaces comply with current regulations, ensuring safe entry, exit and safe passage throughout the building. The regulations mean that people, regardless of disability, age or gender, must be able to gain equal access to public buildings.

For visually impaired people this means amongst other things that there must be a good visual contrast between various elements of the building, including doorways, fixtures and fittings. Therefore the contrast between, for example, floors and walls must achieve a certain level – measured by something called Light Reflectance Value (LRV).

What is LRV?

Visual contrast is measured by LRV, which is the acronym for 'light reflectance value'. The LRV of an object is a measure of the quantity of visible light at all wavelengths that is reflected from the surface when illuminated by a light.

Currently, the recommended difference in LRV values of two surfaces should be greater than 30 points. Where rooms provide adequate illumination measured to greater than 200 lux an LRV value no less than 20 would be acceptable. If further information or clarification is sought please refer to Document M - Part 2 and BS 8300 7.2.5

lrv-shades

Certain fixtures need to contrast visually with the surface to which they are fixed so that they are easier to identify to those with partial sight. Even the floor and the walls need to contrast so that the user can more easily see where the boundaries of the room are.

To qualify, the two colours have to differ by more than 30 points. Where the surfaces are lit by more than 200 lux, the two colours must differ by a minimum of 20 points. And (to make things extra complex) “where door opening furniture projects beyond the face of the door or otherwise creates enhanced differentiation and shade, a minimum difference in light reflectance value of 15 points is considered adequate”, according to Doc M, Volume 2.


Latest Blog Posts

Wealden Rehab hosts two training days for OT's

We conducted two training sessions in our showroom this week for occupational therapists.

image00004
Wealden Rehab hosts two training days for OT's
Read more

Improved weight capacity for the RAZ Shower Chair Range

We’re excited to announce that our RAZ chair range has been improved to offer increased weight capacities on the RAZ AT, RAZ SP and RAZ AP as standard.   ...

raz-weight-capacity-new
Improved weight capacity for the RAZ Shower Chair Range
Read more

The OTs Perspective: Showering, Psychosocial & Physical Benefits

An occupational therapist's perspective on why having a shower provides more benefits than just keeping clean

shower_2
The OTs Perspective: Showering, Psychosocial & Physical Benefits
Read more

RAZ Shower Chairs: Cost efficient and better for the environment

Discover why the RAZ Shower Chairs have such an impressive recycling rate.

raz-recycling_1
RAZ Shower Chairs: Cost efficient and better for the environment
Read more

£30 Million funding for Changing Places toilets now open for applications

Councils are urged to apply for a share of the fund, which will be used to install life-improving Changing Places toilets.  

-30-million
£30 Million funding for Changing Places toilets now open for applications
Read more

Therapy Integration event: Live workshop

Our expert team is delighted to be conducting live, in-person workshops again!

wealden-rise_1
Therapy Integration event: Live workshop
Read more
1

Get in touch